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Here’s my latest from our National Yoga Month Q&A: Two Quick Ways to Relieve Neck & Shoulder Tension. (Watch the vid here: https://www.facebook.com/SaraDiVelloOM)

1: Release the Upper Back with Eagle Arms
Bring the arms in front of you at a 90-degree angle, elbows at shoulder-height. If this is enough of a stretch for the shoulders/upper back, stay here. If you need more of a stretch, drop the left elbow below the right and twine the forearms, pressing the back of the palms together. The key to releasing the upper back muscles is to keep the elbows lifted–equal height to the shoulders–and the shoulders as relaxed and low as possible. Take five to ten deep breaths and switch sides.

2: Release Tight Neck Muscles with a Gentle Stretch
Drop your right ear toward your right shoulder and hold for 5-10 deep breaths. You can then gently turn the gaze toward the floor and hold there for 5-10 breaths. Don’t forget to do the other side too!

Bonus: Schedule “Breathing Breaks” throughout the day! Set your phone or calendar to remind you several times through the day to take cleansing and calming breaths!

NationalYogaMonth‬ Q&A: Let’s do this!

We got some great questions last week! Here are my answers to 3 of them–ranging from drinking and headstands (NO!) to what to do when your wrists hurt in downward facing dog (here’s my favorite option).

Have YOU got questions? ASK! Comment below or send me a private message on my contact page, Facebook, or Twitter, and I’ll answer next week for ‪#‎WellnessWednesday‬ with Healthworks Fitness Centers!

Q: Is it bad to drink beer while doing headstand? –Israel M.

A: Insider tip: The pros go straight for the vodka. KIDDING! In all seriousness, do not drink and yoga. You are more likely to injure yourself. Do yoga and save the cocktails for afterward 🙂

Q: What can I do to take some of the pressure (and resulting pain) out of my wrists in downward facing dog? I’ve been trying to figure this out for years. –Ann P.

A: When the wrists are tender, it can take a while to feel better—especially if they’re already sensitive from working at a computer. When this happens, I like to take the wrists out of the equation altogether. I suggest trying downward facing dog on your forearms (sometimes called Egyptian Dog). That way, you still get all the shoulder-strengthening, upper-body challenge (along with all the other benefits of Dog), without ANY strain on the wrists.

Let them rest for awhile. Then, if you want to try traditional dog again, you can integrate hands and forearms slowly. You can also try elevating the heels of your hands with a fold of a blanket and see if that gives you some relief.

Q: What do you love about yoga –Tatiana

A: I love how it serves as a sanctuary from the rest of life—a place to come and release, receive, and rejuvenate. I love how it supports and nourishes us.

 

Friends, grab your camera, bathing suit, camera and even a yoga mat. I am SO excited to announce I’ll be teaching yoga as part of a private tour through beautiful BALI Oct. 3-10.

Join us as we breathe fresh island air, take in lush landscapes, explore rice fields, bike through back roads of charming villages, eat nourishing, healthy meals, partake in an ancient meditation ceremony, hike up Mt. Batur (pictured below), take a Balinese cooking class…and of course optional daily yoga with me 🙂

The amazing Jess K. at My Adventure Travel put together a holistic tour to make sure you leave the island refreshed and inspired. I can’t wait and I hope you’ll join us.

Did I mention it’s really affordable?

Learn more here.

Need more inspiration??

Read all about my single-girl search for the ever-elusive trifecta of perfection: the tall, dark, and handsome, single straight guy who also does yoga! LOLs welcome 🙂

 

If you’ve been shoveling snow lately (thanks, #Blizzardof2015!), here are the five most important post-shoveling stretches to minimize an aching back and sore muscles later.

1. Release your upper back: Eagle Arms.

Bring the arms in front of you at a 90-degree angle, elbows at shoulder-height. If this is enough of a stretch for the shoulders/upper back, stay here. If you need more of s stretch, drop the left elbow below the right and twine the forearms, pressing the back of the palms together. The key to releasing the upper back muscles is to keep the elbows lifted–equal height to the shoulders–and the shoulders as relaxed and low as possible. Take ten deep breaths and switch sides.













2. Stretch your lower back: Modified Half Moon Pose.
Stand with your feet hip-width apart. Place your right hand on your right hip. Lift the left arm up and then to the right. Take ten deep breaths here, using your breath to expand the left ribs, deepening the stretch. Switch sides.
















3. Release your psoas: Crescent Lunge.
The psoas is the largest hip flexor muscle. It runs up the front of the hip, cuts through the abdominal cavity and attaches to the lower lumbar spine. Stretching the psoas not only gives you a hip flexor stretch, it can also release lower back tightness. Stand in a lunge position, with your right foot forward and the right knee bent at a 90-degree angle. Tuck your tailbone forward to intensify. Stay for 10 deep breaths and switch sides.
















4. Stretch your arms: Forward Bend with Arm Twist. Stand with your feet hip-width apart. Bend forward to a comfortable level, lifting your arms up behind you.  Rotate the thumbs in (toward the center line) and then out to stretch your biceps.








5. Release your chest muscles: Doorway Pose.
As you head in from all your hard work, stand in the doorway and put your right arm out at a ninety-degree angle. Press your palm, forearm, and elbow against the doorframe and twist your chest gently to the left. Stay for 10 deep breaths and switch sides.




Taking time to stretch all the major muscles you’ve just worked will minimize soreness and increase your chances for the quickest snowpocalytic recovery possible. Stay warm, stay hydrated, and remember the most important pose of all: couch-asana, which should be done lying down and for an extended amount of time. 🙂




*Thank you to my co-snowga photographer and model, STC

On the mat and off, your primary focus may be on stretching your muscles. But whatever your level of flexibility—you may actually have a fascial “restriction” on top of your muscles, and the muscles themselves may be perfectly flexible. For this reason, I work both muscularly and fascially in the classes I teach, as well as in my personal practice.

You may be wondering what exactly IS this mysterious, enigmatic fascia, which potentially holds the key to unlocking the next level of your practice?

Fascia is a wet, slippery, see-through tissue in your body that pretty much looks like Saran wrap. If you’ve ever cooked raw chicken, you know exactly what I’m talking about. And if you gagged at the thought of raw chicken, make yourself some peppermint tea, and keep reading.

Like raw chicken, humans have that same slippery cling-wrap encasing all our muscles, organs, and other body parts. If you’re not working fascially, you’re missing out on an important component of flexibility and functionality on and off the mat.

Important note: fascia doesn’t stretch. Ever. It can, however, get stuck or “caught” when ideally it should slip and glide. You can release these restrictions three ways: with massage therapy; foam rolling; and/or slow, deep stretching.

Today we’re going to use slow, deep, stretching to help release both hip flexor muscles, and the fascial covering over your hip flexors. I chose to work on hip flexors in this piece, because they can contribute to front-hip pain as well as lower-back pain. The psoas muscle, which is the deepest muscle in your entire body as well as one of your largest muscles, runs up the front of your hip, cuts through your abdominal cavity, and attaches into your lumbar spine. A tight psoas can pull you into lordosis, or being swaybacked, as well as cause lower-back tightness. The psoas is important not only for initiating every single step you take (it’s the largest of the hip flexors—as in, it “flexes” your leg up to take each step), it’s also key to spinal and abdominal health and strength. On the mat, it’s an integral part of many poses—among them, navasana (boat pose), forward folds, and many more.
Let’s get started.

From Low Lunge:

  • Make sure your right knee is directly above your ankle.
  • Draw your back knee down to the mat (as shown above).
  • Rest your palms on blocks at whatever height best supports you, and lets your arms stay relaxed. The elbows should be at ease—be careful not to brace or “lock” them out.
  • Stay for 5-8 cycles of slow breath. Really tune in and focus on the sensations in your hip flexors (the front of your right hip). How tight  are they? Is this side easy for you? Do you feel them stretching?
  • Now let’s move on to the fascial release. Make sure you still feel a stretch in your hip flexors. If you’re really flexible here, you may need to bring your chest a bit more forward and/or down until you get the right amount of stretch for you. If you’re really, really flexible here, you may need to bring the right arm inside the right leg in order to bring your chest down low enough to feel a stretch.WHEN you feel that stretch, let your head hang gently forward (as show above).
  • NOTICE how this brings you deeper into the hip flexor release, if you have fascial restriction in addition to muscular tightness. It can feel really intense or almost “pinchy.” If you don’t have a fascial restriction, you may not feel this stretch intensify but stay with it regardless so that you have a baseline to compare the release on your left side.
  • Stay for 5 more cycles of breath. Gently lift the head up. Tuck under the back toes and come up to a low lunge.
  • Switch sides and repeat.

Remember that everyone’s body is somewhat asymmetrical. You will have a tighter side and an easier side. You may also have a fascial restriction on only one side, or one day/week/month and not the next. Tune in and really notice your body in each pose. Notice how the muscular and fascial releases feel different. Notice which works best for you each time. Your only goal is to serve and support your body so that it can better serve and support you–both on the mat and off.

*This piece also appeared on Sequence Yoga Mats “Serious Sundays.”

Nothing says holidays like baking cookies…yoga pose cookies that is.

I sketched these out on heavy duty paper from an art store, making yoga pose cutouts (they're cute–admit it!),

Then I made this super simple, super delicious sugar cookie recipe from Alton Brown over at the food network (Note: the dough needs to refrigerate for a few hours between making it and rolling them out. Learn from my mistake and read the whole recipe first!)

I placed ice cubes all over the counter to chill it down (warm countertops melt the butter in the dough too fast, making it a gooey mess), placed my cutouts on the dough, and cut around each with a steak knife.

Popped them in the oven for 7 minutes (note: Alton says rotate them every three minutes. Oh, Alton, you little devil! What the heck does that mean?! In an effort to follow this confusing direction, I rotated the trays 90 degrees and switched the trays from oven rack top to bottom just to mix them up as much as possible. Are you impressed, Alton? Are you??)

They are super delicious and really easy to make. Get going!

Notes:

  1. The dough gets crumbly–patch it back together with a spritz of water. I used my curly-haired sister Hanna's curl-spritzing bottle. It worked!
  2. Keep the counters cool near a hot oven with ice on them
  3. THOROUGHLY dry the counters, dust them with powdered sugar
  4. %%anc%%

  5. Dust the rolling pin with powdered sugar too–otherwise the damn dough will stick to it too.
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